More famous than Jesus – about the song

MORE FAMOUS THAN JESUSsawtat1.jpg

When I wrote More Famous Than Jesus I was thinking about John Lennon and the hoo ha that happened when he stated the obvious fact that the Beatles meant more to the people of his generation at the time than Jesus did.
Man what an example of shallow people feeling threatened by the truth as they try to hold on to the illusion of a lie.

From there I thought about how the personalities of the great masters have become more famous than that which they were trying to teach us.
So I tried to write a song about how it made me feel, the lies and twisted half-truths handed down through the centuries and how easy it can be to be seduced by the great lie. I don’t know whether other people have experienced the spin it can create in a person who is walking the path but I know that as long as I breathe I will never follow the lie.

Hitler is a perfect example of a follower and messenger of the great lie and Martin Luther King was an example to me of someone who followed the truth as best he was able to, showing great courage and conviction against seemingly impossible odds.
Although the traffickers of the great lie had him assassinated his example still lives on and inspires many who struggle daily with their path through life.

I decided to use as an example the three religions that have had the most affect on the human race throughout history, Christianity, Islam and Buddhism.
I don’t know if I really succeeded in getting this message across, some people get it and some don’t but like all who try to find their way through the web of lies and deceit that litter this world I tried and I guess in the attempt I have succeeded in some way.

This song is probably the one that has the most collaboration from the various musicians that played on the album.
It was a song that developed over time as each person added their bit, slowly taking shape into what you now hear.
It is also the only song on which I played mandolin before I was forced to stop playing by the arthritis in my wrist and hand.

I love the dynamics in this song, from Jai’s bass playing to Simone’s soaring vocal to Martin Luther battling it out with Hitler and hopefully amongst it all, the lyrics I sing manage to convey the message I felt needed to be said.

So remember that it is not the messenger but the message that is most important.
It is not the lie but the truth that will set you free.

3 Responses to “More famous than Jesus – about the song”

  1. on 01 Aug 2008 at 2:20 pm Art

    Hey! great song and heavy clip man. Love your style and good to see you making a statement for the religious right! Or is that against! cheers. Art

  2. on 03 Jan 2009 at 4:42 am Stephen

    Sorry man.
    I don’t agree with you.
    It’s not about the famousness of Jesus (even though there is nothing that can really rival His popularity).
    The impact of His life and the words He spoke is what matters. Jesus ministered for 3 and a half years on this earth.
    Today you have the advantage of modern communication to express your views. Billions of people can be exposed to what we think and our views in seconds.
    Jesus had none of that. Just 12 uneducated men to tell the world about Him.
    3 and a half years from now, what will become of this song? It is available for billions to see in seconds. Will the world remember it in 3 and a half years? In 2000 years?

    Your song, with its video and lyrics repeats age old issues that have been with man from the beginning. But your expression does not bring life to the situation. Most who see this song will forget everything about it in a day or so. But the words of Jesus are eternal. Open your eyes to the thousands upon thousands who are finding meaning to life through his power. At this very moment!

    Seek him. He will bring life to you and help you to give direct answers to some of the issues your video brought up. This world needs answers – not facts and history.

    Bless you
    Stephen

  3. on 10 Feb 2009 at 1:51 pm Greg

    Hi Steven,
    Thanks for your comment, it is always good to have an honest opinion.
    Unfortunately (and I mean no disrespect), I think the message I was trying to convey in this song has been lost on you.

    It isn’t about the famousness of Jesus or Buddha or Mohamed or any other messenger of wisdom, it is about what they said, the wisdom of their insights that they shared with us.
    So yes I agree with what you said, it is the message that is important not the messenger.

    Whether people are still listening to this song in three years or a thousand is irrelevant and unimportant.
    It was written as an expression of what I felt about the subject not for it to be as enduring in popularity as Jesus.
    Even mentioning his name can be like a hot potato, someone is sure to find something to be offended about it.

    A perfect and most famous example was John Lennon’s comment about the Beatles meaning more to the youth of England at the time than Jesus did.
    And it was true, they were more relevant to the youth of the age but sure enough those seeing life through religious glasses found it an excuse to preach their holier than though principles.
    A lot of those same people would have thought it perfectly O.K. to hang negroes or some other minority that was different to them, if the bible told them so.

    I don’t need Jesus or any other prophet to feel fulfilled in my life.
    I am responsible for all I do and say and thinking that I can offer up all my sins to Jesus or some other seems like a cop out to me.

    If you want to believe in a God, look at it this way.
    We are all the children of God, we are all equal in the sight of God including Jesus who I think he must be a bit tired of being put on a pedestal all the time.

    Anyway Stephen, I don’t have the arrogance to think I know the mind of a God.
    I think if I tried it would blow me away into atoms, dancing away forever into the realms of infinity.

    Blossom On,
    Greg

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